1.A.2.g. Paying residents

Rule

Policy and procedures that ensure the following conditions are met if the residence provider employs, contracts with or enters into a paid work agreement with residents:

  • Paid work arrangements are completely voluntary.

  • Residents do not suffer consequences for declining work.

  • Residents who accept paid work are not treated more favorably than residents who do not.

  • Paid work for the operator or staff does not impair participating residents’ progress towards their recovery goals.

  • The paid work is treated the same as any other employment situation.

  • Wages commensurate with marketplace value and are at least minimum wage.

  • The arrangements are viewed by a majority of the residents as fair.

  • Paid work does not confer (grant) special privileges to residents doing the work.

  • Work relationships do not negatively affect the recovery environment or morale of the home.

  • Unsatisfactory work relationships are terminated without recriminalization (retaliation) that can impair recovery.

Levels

I

II

III

IV

This rule applies to all recovery residence levels of support

Guidance

To increase an individual’s recovery capital and social determinants, most recovery residences place a cultural value around employment. A job helps residents afford the support and services they need and gain a sense of purpose (e.g. engage in meaningful daily activities). While most recovery residences focus on linking residents to employment in the “mainstream” marketplace, there are various scenarios in which a recovery residence may choose to employ residents. This raises concerns around exploitation. Unfortunately, there are examples of residence providers who have forced residents to work jobs for low wages, to repay debts or to avoid direct or indirect punishments. If a recovery residence provider is going to employ resident(s), they must have protective policies and procedures in place.

Positive examples of when recovery residence employs residents:

  • Using social model recovery principles, recovery residences reward residents’ progress with greater responsibilities. This can lead to being offered a paid, non-clinical staff position. House Managers are often compensated with free or discounted rent, if not more.

  • As a cornerstone of their program, some recovery residences incorporate a supportive employment component. This gives residents an opportunity to learn skills and earn money to help “pay their way”. While the employment component may offset some of the operating costs, this is generally not a primary goal of the program. Supportive employment is meant to build personal recovery capital and is never used to entrap, endebt or endanger participants.

Negative example of when a recovery residence pays residents:

  • The recovery residence is paid by a local poultry processing plant to provide cheap labor. To maintain their recovery housing, residents must work at the plant. Getting kicked out of their recovery housing is a violation of their parole, meaning residents who refuse to work at the poultry plant are sent back to prison.

  • Peonage (debt servitude) is a system where an employer compels a worker to pay off a debt with work. If a recovery residence owner/operator is also a residents employer, and they garnish the residents wages to pay the rent and other fees.

Frequently asked questions:

  • Does this rule apply to House Managers who live in the residence? To the extent that the House Manager is being compensated for recovery residence duties, this rule does not apply. Expectations regarding the support of recovery residence staff are addressed in other NARR standards. To the extent that the House Manager is a resident and is being compensated for work in a supportive employment program or other business venture, this rule may apply.

Evaluation

  • Does the recovery residence provider employ, contract with or enter into a paid work agreements with residents?

  • Is there a policy and procedure in place that ensures the following conditions are met, if and when there are paid work agreements with residents:

    • Paid work arrangements are completely voluntary;

    • Residents do not suffer consequences for declining work;

    • Residents who accept paid work are not treated more favorably than residents who do not;

    • Paid work for the operator or staff does not impair participating residents’ progress towards their recovery goals;

    • The paid work is treated the same as any other employment situation

    • Wages are commensurate with marketplace value and at least minimum wage;

    • The arrangements are viewed by a majority of the residents as fair;

    • Paid work does not confer (grant) special privileges to residents doing the work;

    • Work relationships do not negatively affect the recovery environment or morale of the home;

    • Unsatisfactory work relationships are terminated without recriminalization (retaliation) that can impair recovery?

Evidence

  • Attestation as to whether there are paid work agreements with residents

  • Policies and procedures

References

Course Syllabus

Not Enrolled
1.A. Operate with Integrity
1.A.1. Use mission and vision as guides for decision making
1.A.1.a. Mission
1.A.1.b. Vision
1.A.2. Adhere to legal and ethical codes and use best business practices
1.A.2.a. Business entity
1.A.2.b. Insurance
1.A.2.c. Property permission
1.A.2.d. Legal compliance
1.A.2.e. Ethical marketing
1.A.2.f. Background checks
1.A.2.g. Paying residents
1.A.2.h. Financial boundaries
1.A.2.i. Code of Ethics
1.A.3. Financial accounting
1.A.3.a. Fee transparency
1.A.3.b. Accounting system
1.A.3.c. Refund policies
1.A.3.d. 3rd party payments
1.A.4. Data collection
1.A.4.a. Resident information
1. ADMINISTRATIVE AND OPERATIONAL
1.B. Uphold Residents’ Rights
1.B.5. Rights and Requirements
1.B.6. Resident information
1.B.6.a. Secured records
1.B.6.b. Confidentiality
1.B.6.c. Social media policy
1.C. Culture of Empowerment
1.C.7. Peer governance
1.C.7.a. Resident driven
1.C.7.b. Grievance policy
1.C.7.c. Community posts
1.C.7.d. Length of stay
1.C.7.e. Resident voice
1.C.8. Resident involvement
1.C.8.a. Reciprocal responsibility
1.C.8.b. Leadership roles
1.C.8.c. Recovery process
1.D. Develop Staff Abilities
2. PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT
2.E. Home-like Environment
2.F. Safe Healthy Environment
Recovery Residence Certification
3. RECOVERY SUPPORT
3.G. Facilitate Recovery
3.G.20. Promote purpose
3.G.20.a. Meaningful activities
3.G.21. Recovery planning
3.G.21.a. Person-centered plan
3.G.21.b. Recovery capital
3.G.21.c. Peer roles
3.G.22. Community supports
3.G.22.a. Resource directory
3.G.22.b. Resource linkage
3.G.23. Mutual support
3.G.23.a. Weekly schedule
3.G.23.b. Mutual aid
3.G.24. Recovery support services
3.G.24.a. RSS
3.G.24.b. RSS Staff
3.G.25. Clinical services
3.G.25.a. Clinical services
3.H. Model Prosocial Behaviors
3.H.26. Respectful environment
3.H.26.a. Model recovery
3.H.26.b. Trauma informed
3.H.26.c. Resident input
3.I. Sense of Community
4. GOOD NEIGHBOR
4.J. Be a Good Neighbor
4.J.30. Responsive neighbor
4.J.30.a. Contact information
4.J.30.b. Complaint response
4.J.30.c. Neighbor interaction
4.J.31. Courtesy rules
4.J.31.a. Preemptive policies
4.J.31.b. Parking